KEFCon - The Third

1-3 Sep, 2017 in Edmonton, AB, CA

Sep 2017

SlotScenarioGame / CampaignPlayersGMs
9:30am-12:30pm
GMT-07
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Champions of Midgard (formerly Defenders of Nidaros) is a middleweight, Viking-themed, worker placement game with dice rolling in which players are leaders of Viking clans who have traveled to an embattled Viking harbor town to help defend it against the threat of trolls, draugr, and other mythological Norse beasts. By defeating these epic creatures, players gain glory and the favor of the gods. When the game ends, the player who has earned the most glory earns the title of Jarl and is recognized as a champion of Midgard!

Placing workers allows for the collection of resources and warriors, which players may then send on journeys to neighboring villages or across the sea to defeat monsters and gain the glory they need for victory. Resources are used to carve runes, build ships, and feed your followers. Viking warriors (custom dice) do battle with the myriad enemies the town faces.

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Burgle your way to adventure in the deck-building board game Clank! Sneak into an angry dragon's mountain lair to steal precious artifacts. Delve deeper to find more valuable loot. Acquire cards for your deck and watch your thievish abilities grow.

Be quick and be quiet. One false step and CLANK! Each careless sound draws the attention of the dragon, and each artifact stolen increases its rage. You can enjoy your plunder only if you make it out of the depths alive!

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In this latest collaboration between Bruno Cathala and Ludovic Maublanc, players must buy the favor of the gods in their race to be the first player to build two cities in the Ancient Greek island group known as the Cyclades.

Victory requires respect for all the gods - players cannot afford to sacrifice to only one god, but must pay homage to each of five gods in turn. Each turn, the players bid for the favors of the gods, as only one player can have the favor of each god per turn - and each player is also limited to the favor of a single god per turn.
Ares allows the movement of player armies and the building of Fortresses.
Poseidon allows players to move their navies and build Ports.
Zeus allows his followers to hire priests and build temples.
Athena provides her worshipers with philosophers and universities.
Apollo increases the income of his worshipers.

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What would your house look like? Would you rather have a huge bedroom with an elegant canopy bed or a spacious living room with a grand piano? You are going to play a part of designers who will plan a house and add more and more rooms to it.

Dream Home is a family game about building and furnishing your new house. Over twelve rounds, players collect pairs of cards consisting of a room card and an accessory card (roof, helper, furnishing or tool) and place them on their personal boards, creating their dream homes.

At the end of the game, all players’ houses are finished and fully furnished. Players compare their houses, counting points for functionality, good design, quality of roof and furnishing. The player with the nicest and most comfortable house wins.

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Kaiju Conquest is a sci-fi strategy board game of alien invasion and battles between giant mecha and monsters.

The Kaiju forces, known as the Sazzarran, are using Earth as a testing ground for their matter transport devices, known as Portals to the humans. The humans best defense against this alien invasion is the UNRF, United Nations Reaction Force.

Each game round, the players will take turns conducting one of the 6 phases of battle. In the World Events Phase They will first roll on their World Events chart to see what advantages or disadvantages they receive for that round. In the Resource Phase, each player will draw a certain amount of Resource cards based on the number of friendly city and non-city zones they occupy. These cards will be their military forces and any Mecha or Titans that can be put into play.

In the Movement Phase, starting with the Sazzarran forces, each player will deploy their units to occupy zones and engage enemy forces. In the Battle Phase, each side uses a Command Initiative system on a Battleboard to determine which unit attacks first. A battle is complete when only forces from one side remain in the contested zone.

In the Re-Deployment Phase, each player will re-deploy their forces to reinforce zones they occupy. In the Control Phase, each player will tally up the number of enemy units destroyed, as well as zones they control for Victory Points (VP's). The player who reaches or exceeds 120 VP's at the end of a round is the winner. Any ties are broken by playing one more round. If there is still a tie, the winner is determined by the number of zones and bases they have in play.

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Four wanderers search for the Last Ruin, a city that legends say contains an artifact that will grant the greatest desires of the heart. A lost love, redemption, acceptance, a family rejoined-- these are the fires that fuel the wanderers' journeys, but can they overcome their own greed and inner demons on the way?

In Near and Far, you and up to three friends explore many different maps in a search for the Last Ruin, recruiting adventurers, hunting for treasure, and competing to be the most storied traveler. You must collect food and equipment at town for long journeys to mysterious locales, making sure not to forget enough weapons to fight off bandits, living statues, and rusty robots! Sometimes in your travels you'll run into something unique and one of your friends will read what happens to you from a book of stories, giving you a choice of how to react, creating a new and memorable tale each time you play.

Near and Far is a sequel to Above and Below and includes a book of encounters. This time players read over ten game sessions to reach the end of the story. Each chapter is played on a completely new map with unique art and adventures.

Answer the call of the ruins and begin your journey.

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As a giant airship travels to various far-flung locales, rival gangs compete to pull off daring heists. Your job is to recruit various skilled criminals to join your gang as you plan to take down fortified locations and steal the loot guarded within. You may also complete smaller jobs on the airship itself as it travels across the globe. Set in a steampunk world, Skyway Robbery offers high adventure and cunning, card-driven game play.

A player's turn consists of selecting three action cards and determining their order in secret. Once all players have selected their three actions, the cards are revealed and resolved in turn. Most actions allow players to purchase new cards (hire gang members and buy equipment) from areas on the board or engage in an illegal, but lucrative, activity. Whoever earns the most Reputation points at the end of the game is the winner.

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The game is set in the Burgundy region of High Medieval France. Each player takes on the role of an aristocrat, originally controlling a small princedom. While playing they aim to build settlements and powerful castles, practice trade along the river, exploit silver mines, and use the knowledge of travelers.

The game is about players taking settlement tiles from the game board and placing them into their princedom which is represented by the player board. Every tile has a function that starts when the tile is placed in the princedom. The princedom itself consists of several regions, each of which demands its own type of settlement tile.

The game is played in five phases, each consisting of five rounds. Each phase begins with the game board stocked with settlement tiles and goods tiles. At the beginning of each round all players roll their two dice, and the player who is currently first in turn order rolls a goods placement die. A goods tile is made available on the game board according to the roll of the goods die. During each round players take their turns in the current turn order. During his turn, a player may perform any two of the four possible types of actions: 1) take a settlement tile from the numbered depot on the game board corresponding to one of his dice and place it in the staging area on his player board, 2) take a settlement tile from the staging area of his player board to a space on his player board with a number matching one of his dice in the corresponding region for the type of tile and adjacent to a previously placed settlement tile, 3) deliver goods with a number matching one of his dice, or 4) take worker tokens which allow the player to adjust the roll of his dice. In addition to these actions a player may buy a settlement tile from the central depot on the game board and place it in the staging area on his player board. If an action triggers the award of victory points, those points are immediately recorded. Each settlement tile offers a benefit, additional actions, additional money, advancement on the turn order track, more goods tiles, die roll adjustment or victory points. Bonus victory points are awarded for filling a region with settlement tiles.

The game ends when the last player finishes his turn of the fifth round of the fifth phase. Victory points are awarded for unused money and workers, and undelivered goods. Bonus victory points from certain settlement tiles are awarded at the end of the game.

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From the ashes of war, nations rise to power in the atomic age. Each player takes control of a nation struggling for power in the latter part of the 20th century. They build up their nation’s industry, commerce, and government by acquiring resources, building structures, and tapping sources of energy. The price of oil is going up, and nuclear energy is the wave of the future. The Manhattan Project: Energy Empire is set in the same "universe" as The Manhattan Project, but it's a standalone game, not an expansion.

The major threat in Energy Empire is not war, but uncertain global impacts, that result from side effects of industrialization and pollution. Many actions come with a cost. So, as nations become more industrious, they also increase the amount of pollution in the environment. Careful use of science can mitigate the harmful effects of industry, and can also help avert global crises.

Energy Empire uses worker placement, tableau-building, and resource management mechanics. On each turn, a player can choose to either work or generate. On a work turn, a player plays a single worker on the main board, then uses workers and energy to activate cards in their tableau. Players may spend energy to use an occupied space on the main board, so no spaces are ever completely blocked. On a generate turn, players get to renew their supply of energy by rolling "energy dice" that represent nuclear, coal, oil, solar, and other forms of energy.

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In The Others, the world stands on the brink of apocalypse, as the fanatics of the Hell Club have summoned the 7 Deadly Sins to lay waste to our reality. Slowly the Others have creeped into our lives, corrupting society from within. The city of Haven is the key to their invasion, but it will not go down without a fight, thanks to the actions of the paranormal organization known as F.A.I.T.H. (Federal Authority for the Interdiction of Transdimensional Horrors). Each session of The Others is played with one player controlling the forces of a single Sin, against the other players who control a team of 7 FAITH heroes. The heroes cooperate to survive the Sin's attacks and accomplish the missions set before them, while the Sin attempts to thwart the heroes in all ways (preferably by destroying them).

The heroes are divided into different classes, each specialized in a different aspect of the game. Leaders are good at helping the other members of the team. Bruisers are excellent melee fighters. Snipers are experts at using guns to put down monsters from a distance. And Fixers have the resourcefulness and knowledge of the occult necessary to resolve supernatural crises that spread through the city. Each hero also has their own stats and unique abilities that set them apart from all others. Knowing when to bring in the right reinforcement can be key to FAITH’s victory.

Corruption is one of the main mechanics of the game. It is both a way for the Sin to consume heroes, and a way for heroes to accomplish amazing feats they wouldn’t be capable of normally. Taking corruption grants heroes powerful bonuses (as long as they keep taking corruption), but when they become fully corrupted, their darkest secrets may come back to haunt them and tear the team from within, or their flesh might simply succumb to the sinful influences.

The Sins player, on the other hand, has access to the different monsters of each Sin, including Abominations, a Controller, and the terrifying Avatar of Sin! These monsters can attempt to destroy the heroes, or simply hinder their progress on their missions. Each Sin provides the Sins Player with a different deck of Sins cards that can be played at different times to surprise players with different effects, often tied to the strategy of each Sin. Yes, because each Sin taints the game with an overarching mechanic that is always in effect. For example, Pride punishes prideful heroes that venture into the streets on their own, while Sloth punishes heroes who try to move quickly across the board. Heroes will need to learn to deal with the different influence of each Sin, which will always stand between them and their mission.

The Sins are also aided by Acolytes, with each session using a different type. These lowly corrupted servants of darkness can fight and stand in the way of heroes, but they also have a once per round special ability that reflects their previous lives. For example, corrupted hobos take equipment from heroes, corrupted nuns corrupt the city districts, and corrupted doctors keep heroes from healing.

There are 7 different stories that players can embark on for each session of The Others. Each of them brings different special rules, different dynamics, and a unique system of branching missions the heroes need to accomplish in order to be victorious. There are Terror stories, which are more straightforward, focusing on action and combat; Corruption stories revolve around the Corruption spreading through the city and the heroes themselves; and Redemption stories rely on saving the city and the few innocents that remain. Each story can be played on a different map setup, which further makes the dynamic of each session unique.

The board used in The Others is made up of several tiles, each depicting a different city district and different configurations of streets. As the city of Haven still belongs to humanity, and it’s the Sins that are attempting to take it over, the heroes can use it to get different benefits each district offers them. For example, they can go to the hospital to heal wounds, to the museum to get rid of corruption, to the RavenCorp tower to get new equipment, or to the police station to call in an orbital strike. What districts are available on each map, and their location, can greatly change the dynamic of the game.

As the game progresses, and depending on how badly the heroes fare against storyline plot twists and developments, the Apocalypse Track will advance, making the Sins gradually stronger and more terrifying. Apocalypse cards, tied to the type of story being played (Terror, Corruption, or Redemption) introduce new twists and challenges to the game, even bringing in the members of the Hell Club themselves!

Heroes will die. Either in noble sacrifice, torn apart by claws and tentacles, or consumed by the corruption welling up in their souls. The question is whether the FAITH team will manage to fulfill their final mission in time, or whether the Sins will reign supreme over humanity.

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Each turn in Vikings Gone Wild — a deck-building, resource management game based on the online real-time strategy game — players can either buy permanent buildings sitting in front of them (resource factories, resources containers, etc) or buy units, towers and special cards that improve their deck and offense/defense capacity.

The only way to win is by successfully attacking each other, and each attack involves interesting bluffing mechanisms in which the attacker doesn't know the defense capacity of their opponent...

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1-3:30pm
GMT-07
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Your last village was ransacked by barbarians. You barely had time to pick up the baby and your favorite fishing pole before they started the burning and pillaging. You wandered over a cruel desert, braved frozen peaks, and even paddled a log across a rough sea, kicking at the sharks whenever they got too close, the baby strapped tightly to your back.

Then you found it! The perfect place to make your new home. But as soon as you had the first hut built, you discovered a vast network of caverns underground, brimming with shiny treasures, rare resources, and untold adventure. How could you limit your new village to the surface? You immediately start organizing expeditions and building houses underground as well as on the surface.

With any luck, you'll build a village even stronger than your last-- strong enough, even, to turn away the barbarians the next time they come knocking.

Above and Below is a mashup of town-building and storytelling where you and up to three friends compete to build the best village above and below ground. In the game, you send your villagers to perform jobs like exploring the cave, harvesting resources, and constructing houses. Each villager has unique skills and abilities, and you must decide how to best use them. You have your own personal village board, and you slide the villagers on this board to various areas to indicate that they've been given jobs to do. Will you send Hanna along on the expedition to the cave? Or should she instead spend her time teaching important skills to one of the young villagers?

A great cavern lies below the surface, ready for you to explore-- this is where the storytelling comes in. When you send a group of villagers to explore the depths, one of your friends reads what happens to you from a book of paragraphs. You'll be given a choice of how to react, and a lot will depend on which villagers you brought on the expedition, and who you're willing to sacrifice to succeed. The book of paragraphs is packed with encounters of amazing adventure, randomly chosen each time you visit the cavern.

At the end of the game, the player with the most well-developed village wins!

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Inferno is a standalone expansion to Arcadia Quest. It is 100% compatible with the original base game and introduces four new Guilds: Sharks, Tigers, Crows, and Serpents. It features new types of heroes, such as Alchemists and Gladiators.

There is a new branching campaign system, and the storyline revolves around the guilds descending into a fiery abyss. There are Brimstone cards that make the terrain risky to navigate, which operate similarly to the Tombstone cards from Arcadia Quest: Beyond the Grave.

A new mechanism called "Damnation" will tempt the heroes with powerful weapons that can corrupt the characters over time or change the behavior of nearby monsters. There are also Angels, which are allied characters for the heroes to rescue, escort or assist. Working with the Angels can affect the branching campaign path system and even allow the player to recruit them for use in later missions.

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Control your network of spies, gather intel, and break codes in Covert, a game of tactical dice placement, set collection, and timing set in Cold War Europe. Players race to complete high risk Missions by deploying their agents and acquiring the necessary equipment, all while keeping an eye on the needs of future missions and the advances of rival agencies.

Each round, players roll their hand of dice and in turn allocate them to different actions, like moving their Agents, acquiring Agency Cards, completing and acquiring new Missions, and more. Dice are placed on action circles that require players to place their dice numerically adjacent to dice that have already been placed, allowing for rival agencies to thwart their plans — but a good Agent always has a backup plan, and there are ways around everything that stands in your way.

Covert combines simple concepts with a depth of play that allows players the freedom to combine special abilities and card combos to complete their Missions and overcome obstacles. Utilize your assets. Make your move. Don't let anyone stand in your way.

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*Note, This game is a 2-slot game and runs till 6:30 pm. Please don't register for games in the 3:30 pm - 6:30 pm slot*

The galaxy has been a peaceful place for many years. After the ruthless Terran–Hegemony War (30.027–33.364), much effort has been employed by all major spacefaring species to prevent the terrifying events from repeating themselves. The Galactic Council was formed to enforce precious peace, and it has taken many courageous efforts to prevent the escalation of malicious acts. Nevertheless, tension and discord are growing among the seven major species and in the Council itself. Old alliances are shattering, and hasty diplomatic treaties are made in secrecy. A confrontation of the superpowers seems inevitable – only the outcome of the galactic conflict remains to be seen. Which faction will emerge victorious and lead the galaxy under its rule?

A game of Eclipse places you in control of a vast interstellar civilization, competing for success with its rivals. You will explore new star systems, research technologies, and build spaceships with which to wage war. There are many potential paths to victory, so you need to plan your strategy according to the strengths and weaknesses of your species, while paying attention to the other civilizations' endeavors.

The shadows of the great civilizations are about to eclipse the galaxy. Lead your people to victory!

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In Scroll City, players take on the roles of visiting scholars who have travelled with a small group of Research Assistants to the city of Alexandria, Egypt, which boasts one of the greatest collections of learning in the ancient world. Out-maneuver your rivals by recruiting eager new Research Assistants to acquire and study important books from the different centres of learning in the city, while building up “concepts” to improve your standing in the disciplines of Science, Philosophy, History, and the Arts. Scroll City combines dice rolling and dice placement with area control, worker placement, hand and resource management, along with Tetris-style puzzle solving into a unique gameplay experience that will appeal to those who enjoy both European and American-style games. Roll for scrolls and fill your brain--literally--in Scroll City!

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Kaiju Conquest is a sci-fi strategy board game of alien invasion and battles between giant mecha and monsters.

The Kaiju forces, known as the Sazzarran, are using Earth as a testing ground for their matter transport devices, known as Portals to the humans. The humans best defense against this alien invasion is the UNRF, United Nations Reaction Force.

Each game round, the players will take turns conducting one of the 6 phases of battle. In the World Events Phase They will first roll on their World Events chart to see what advantages or disadvantages they receive for that round. In the Resource Phase, each player will draw a certain amount of Resource cards based on the number of friendly city and non-city zones they occupy. These cards will be their military forces and any Mecha or Titans that can be put into play.

In the Movement Phase, starting with the Sazzarran forces, each player will deploy their units to occupy zones and engage enemy forces. In the Battle Phase, each side uses a Command Initiative system on a Battleboard to determine which unit attacks first. A battle is complete when only forces from one side remain in the contested zone.

In the Re-Deployment Phase, each player will re-deploy their forces to reinforce zones they occupy. In the Control Phase, each player will tally up the number of enemy units destroyed, as well as zones they control for Victory Points (VP's). The player who reaches or exceeds 120 VP's at the end of a round is the winner. Any ties are broken by playing one more round. If there is still a tie, the winner is determined by the number of zones and bases they have in play.

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A long time ago at the Japanese Imperial court, the Chinese Emperor offered a giant panda bear as a symbol of peace to the Japanese Emperor. Since then, the Japanese Emperor has entrusted his court members (the players) with the difficult task of caring for the animal by tending to his bamboo garden.

In Takenoko, the players will cultivate land plots, irrigate them, and grow one of the three species of bamboo (Green, Yellow, and Pink) with the help of the Imperial gardener to maintain this bamboo garden. They will have to bear with the immoderate hunger of this sacred animal for the juicy and tender bamboo. The player who manages his land plots best, growing the most bamboo while feeding the delicate appetite of the panda, will win the game.

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The Board Game Blitz is a new event we're trying at KEFCon which involves groups of 4 players that split up to different tables and play board games!

The goal of the game is for each time to score the most points on their respective games and at the end the team with the highest points wins!

But here's the catch, you only get to play each game for 15 minutes and there's no talking to your team mates so you need to figure out what your team members strategy was! So exciting! It's going to be a slobber knocker!

What are the games you ask? Those will be a sweet sweet surprise. (Unless you demand to know en masse then we'll relent)

Winning team gets a sweet prize or four donated by our friends at The Gamers' Lodge!

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Tyrants of the Underdark is a territory control game with a deck-building element.

Each player leads a house of Drow in a section of the Underdark below the Sword Coast. The Drow house is represented by a deck of cards, with each card being a minion in that player's deck. Each minion belongs to one of five aspects of Drow society, and those aspects correspond to different strategies in the game, e.g., malice minions excel at assassinating opponents' troops, while ambition minions are best at recruiting additional minions and promoting minions to your "inner circle", which is a special zone that increases their value at the end of the game.

When you set up the game, you create an 80-card deck by shuffling two 40-card half-decks together, with the half-decks being Drow, Dragons, Demons, and Elemental Evil.

A central marketplace has new minions that can be recruited through influence, one of two resources in the game; purchased cards are placed in your discard pile, then shuffled together with other cards in your deck when needed. The other resource is power, which allows you to place troops on the game board, expand your forces across the map of the Underdark, manipulate happenings in the city, and assassinate enemy troops.

Players gain points by controlling sites, recruiting valuable minions, promoting minions to your inner circle, and assassinating troops, and whoever ends the game with the most points wins.

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Build the city’s greatest theme park, whatever it takes!

Mix your favourite themes, from Pirate, Robot, Vampire, Jungle, Ninja, and Gangster. Build attractions and upgrade them to match blueprints, stack up towering rides, or simply make the most cash.

But watch out - your competitors may pay off the safety inspectors to close your rides or hire hooligans to vandalise your park! How will you get revenge?

Whatever happens, it’s bound to be Unfair.

Over the course of 8 rounds, you play Event cards to help yourself and hinder your opponents, build Attractions and Upgrades using Park cards, and match your park to Blueprints.

Your goal is to build the highest-scoring park at game end, using three main ways to score:
building your park to match Blueprints
building impressively tall Attractions with lots of Upgrades
buying your way to victory with good old fashioned cash
You might hire staff to help you, or build a Super Attraction with a unique ability. Bribing officials and blackmailing politicians is also possible, but entirely optional.

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3:30-6:30pm
GMT-07
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Using the central board in A Feast for Odin, players have to hunt, gather basic materials, refine those materials, develop their production-buildings, build/buy ships, and raid settlements.

The resulting earnings are placed on the players' board in the best possible pattern to produce income and (later) victory points.

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In Colosseum each player is a Roman impresario - producing great spectacles in his or her arena in the hopes of attracting the most spectators. Players earn wealth and glory for each event run, using it to create ever more ambitious events. They will need to improve their arena, find the best performers, lure the Emperor and his nobles, and manage assets for long-term success to be granted the title of Grand Impresario, with tales of your extraordinary spectacles acclaimed throughout the empire.

As commanded by the Emperor, the greatest celebration in Roman history has continued unabated for 99 days. All of Rome has borne witness to the grandest spectacles the empire has ever seen— all to commemorate the opening of the Amphitheatrum Flavium, the Colosseum.

Tens of thousands have flocked to the city to experience the sight of a hundred gladiators in battle...rare and exotic animals prowling the arena floor...and to hear and see the greatest musicians and entertainers from throughout the empire. But these events have only been a prelude to today — the closing finale! As a master impresario you have prepared for this moment your entire life. Titus himself has taken his seat in the Emperor’s Loge. At the drop of his hand, the final spectacle will begin. Your moment in the sun has come...

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Two thousand years ago, the Roman Empire ruled the lands around the Mediterranean Sea. With peace at the borders, harmony inside the provinces, uniform law, and a common currency, the economy thrived and gave rise to mighty Roman dynasties as they expanded throughout the numerous cities. Guide one of these dynasties and send colonists to the remote realms of the Empire; develop your trade network; and appease the ancient gods for their favor — all to gain the chance to emerge victorious!

Concordia is a peaceful strategy game of economic development in Roman times for 2-5 players aged 13 and up. Instead of looking to the luck of dice or cards, players must rely on their strategic abilities. Be sure to watch your rivals to determine which goals they are pursuing and where you can outpace them! In the game, colonists are sent out from Rome to settle down in cities that produce bricks, food, tools, wine, and cloth. Each player starts with an identical set of playing cards and acquires more cards during the game. These cards serve two purposes:

They allow a player to choose actions during the game.
They are worth victory points (VPs) at the end of the game.
Concordia is a strategy game that requires advance planning and consideration of your opponent's moves. Every game is different, not only because of the sequence of new cards on sale but also due to the modular layout of cities. (One side of the game board shows the entire Roman Empire with 30 cities for 3-5 players, while the other shows Roman Italy with 25 cities for 2-4 players.) When all cards have been sold or after the first player builds his 15th house, the game ends. The player with the most VPs from the gods (Jupiter, Saturnus, Mercurius, Minerva, Vesta, etc.) wins the game.

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Build a galactic empire... In the depths of space, the alien races of the Cosmos vie with each other for control of the universe. Alliances form and shift from moment to moment, while cataclysmic battles send starships screaming into the warp. Players choose from dozens of alien races, each with its own unique power to further its efforts to build an empire that spans the galaxy.

Many classic aliens from earlier editions of this beloved game return, such as the Oracle, the Loser, and the Clone. Newly discovered aliens also join the fray, including Remora, Mite, and Tick-Tock. This classic game of alien politics returns from the warp once more.

In Cosmic Encounter, each player is the leader of an alien race. On a player's turn, he or she becomes the offense. The offense encounters another player on a planet by moving a group of his or her ships through the hyperspace gate to that planet. The offense draws from the destiny deck which contains colors, wilds and specials. He or she then takes the hyperspace gate and points at one planet in the system indicated by the drawn destiny card. The offense vs. the defenses ships are in the encounter and both sides are able to invite allies, play an encounter card as well as special cards to try and tip the encounter in their favor.

The object of the game is to establish colonies in other players' planetary systems. Players take turns trying to establish colonies. The winner(s) are the first player(s) to have five colonies on any planets outside his or her home system. A player does not need to have colonies in all of the systems, just colonies on five planets outside his or her home system. These colonies may all be in one system or scattered over multiple systems. The players must use force, cunning, and diplomacy to ensure their victory.

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Cry Havoc is a card-driven, asymmetric, area control war game set in a brutal science fiction setting. Each player commands one of four unique factions with varying abilities and units. The game includes 54 custom miniatures, a large format board, and over one hundred unique cards, all with stunning new artwork.

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Diceborn Heroes is a 1–4 player fantasy dice game similar to the old school JRPGs. Players control a party of heroes whose quests send them to far off lands facing monsters to protect innocent bystanders. They must band together to gain strength and defeat the evils that plagued the fair lands of Dievalice. After each encounter, players will have a chance to level up their classes and learn new skills, giving them more abilities and dice to use in the upcoming battles.

Players choose 1–2 heroes to control on a team of 3–4 heroes and gather a green die for each one, then add 4 attack cards per hero to make an attack deck. Following the setup on the quest card players would then reveal a monster card for each hero into the center. Players roll a pool of dice then assign one to an available attack slot on their hero card(s). Once all dice are assigned players reveal an attack card for each monster then resolve attacks from the lowest to the highest value of card or die. Enemies target the hero that has an assigned die that is equal to or greater than their attack card value. Heroes choose enemies to target and can use hero abilities at any point to gain an edge in battle. After all attacks the attack cards are discarded and heroes gather their dice again, roll and assign all over.

Defeated enemies add cards back into the attack deck; if the deck runs out, heroes start taking additional damage. Once all enemies are defeated, Heroes have the opportunity to buy items and choose the next quest that matches the symbol on their quest card. They also level up by either flipping over their hero card and either taking an ability from one of those cards or covering up the bottom with a new class card.

Together you will either win and defeat the boss or have your party get knocked out by the overwhelming peril. If you win the next time you play the choices you made before will affect the next generation of heroes. Relics that you previously found on quests get added to the item deck and the enemy attack cards that you added will stay and affect the next generation of heroes. The choices you make will continue the story.

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Kaiju Conquest is a sci-fi strategy board game of alien invasion and battles between giant mecha and monsters.

The Kaiju forces, known as the Sazzarran, are using Earth as a testing ground for their matter transport devices, known as Portals to the humans. The humans best defense against this alien invasion is the UNRF, United Nations Reaction Force.

Each game round, the players will take turns conducting one of the 6 phases of battle. In the World Events Phase They will first roll on their World Events chart to see what advantages or disadvantages they receive for that round. In the Resource Phase, each player will draw a certain amount of Resource cards based on the number of friendly city and non-city zones they occupy. These cards will be their military forces and any Mecha or Titans that can be put into play.

In the Movement Phase, starting with the Sazzarran forces, each player will deploy their units to occupy zones and engage enemy forces. In the Battle Phase, each side uses a Command Initiative system on a Battleboard to determine which unit attacks first. A battle is complete when only forces from one side remain in the contested zone.

In the Re-Deployment Phase, each player will re-deploy their forces to reinforce zones they occupy. In the Control Phase, each player will tally up the number of enemy units destroyed, as well as zones they control for Victory Points (VP's). The player who reaches or exceeds 120 VP's at the end of a round is the winner. Any ties are broken by playing one more round. If there is still a tie, the winner is determined by the number of zones and bases they have in play.

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2212: Ginkgo Biloba, the oldest and strongest tree in the world, has become the symbol of a new method for building cities in symbiosis with nature. Humans have exhausted the resources that the Earth offered them, and humanity must now develop cities that maintain a delicate balance between resource production and consumption. Habitable space is scarce, however, and mankind must now face the challenge of building ever upwards. To develop this new type of city, you will gather a team of experts around you, and try to become the best urban planner for Ginkgopolis.

In Ginkgopolis, the city tiles come in three colors: yellow, which provides victory points; red, which provides resources; and blue, which provides new city tiles. Some tiles start in play, and they're surrounded by letter markers that show where new tiles can be placed.

On a turn, each player chooses a card from his hand simultaneously. Players reveal these cards, adding new tiles to the border of the city in the appropriate location or placing tiles on top of existing tiles. Each card in your hand that you don't play is passed on to your left-hand neighbor, so keep in mind how your play might set up theirs!

When you add a new tile to the city, you take a "power" card of the same color, and these cards provide you additional abilities during the game, allowing you to scale up your building and point-scoring efforts.

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Mechs vs. Minions is a cooperative tabletop campaign for 2-4 players. Set in the world of Runeterra, players take on the roles of four intrepid Yordles: Corki, Tristana, Heimerdinger, and Ziggs, who must join forces and pilot their newly-crafted mechs against an army of marauding minions. With modular boards, programmatic command lines, and a story-driven campaign, each mission will be unique, putting your teamwork, programming, and piloting skills to the test.

There are ten missions in total, and each individual mission will take about 60-90 minutes. The box includes five game boards, four command lines (one for each player), four painted mech miniatures, ability and damage decks, a sand timer, a bomb-like-power source miniature, 6 metal trackers, 4 acrylic shards, 4 dice, and 100 minion miniatures. There also appears to be some large object trying to get out of that sealed box...

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In the 2400s, mankind begins to terraform the planet Mars. Giant corporations, sponsored by the World Government on Earth, initiate huge projects to raise the temperature, the oxygen level, and the ocean coverage until the environment is habitable. In Terraforming Mars, you play one of those corporations and work together in the terraforming process, but compete for getting victory points that are awarded not only for your contribution to the terraforming, but also for advancing human infrastructure throughout the solar system, and doing other commendable things.

The players acquire unique project cards (from over two hundred different ones) by buying them to their hand. The projects (cards) can represent anything from introducing plant life or animals, hurling asteroids at the surface, building cities, to mining the moons of Jupiter and establishing greenhouse gas industries to heat up the atmosphere. The cards can give you immediate bonuses, as well as increasing your production of different resources. Many cards also have requirements and they become playable when the temperature, oxygen, or ocean coverage increases enough. Buying cards is costly, so there is a balance between buying cards (3 megacredits per card) and actually playing them (which can cost anything between 0 to 41 megacredits, depending on the project). Standard Projects are always available to complement your cards.

Your basic income, as well as your basic score, is based on your Terraform Rating (starting at 20), which increases every time you raise one of the three global parameters. However, your income is complemented with your production, and you also get VPs from many other sources.

Each player keeps track of their production and resources on their player boards, and the game uses six types of resources: MegaCredits, Steel, Titanium, Plants, Energy, and Heat. On the game board, you compete for the best places for your city tiles, ocean tiles, and greenery tiles. You also compete for different Milestones and Awards worth many VPs. Each round is called a generation (guess why) and consists of the following phases:

1) Player order shifts clockwise.
2) Research phase: All players buy cards from four privately drawn.
3) Action phase: Players take turns doing 1-2 actions from these options: Playing a card, claiming a Milestone, funding an Award, using a Standard project, converting plant into greenery tiles (and raising oxygen), converting heat into a temperature raise, and using the action of a card in play. The turn continues around the table (sometimes several laps) until all players have passed.
4) Production phase: Players get resources according to their terraform rating and production parameters.

When the three global parameters (temperature, oxygen, ocean) have all reached their goal, the terraforming is complete, and the game ends after that generation. Count your Terraform Rating and other VPs to determine the winning corporation!

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The T.I.M.E Agency protects humanity by preventing temporal faults and paradoxes from threatening the fabric of our universe. As temporal agents, you and your team will be sent into the bodies of beings from different worlds or realities to successfully complete the missions given to you. Failure is impossible, as you will be able to go back in time as many times as required.

T.I.M.E Stories is a narrative game, a game of "decksploration". Each player is free to give their character as deep a "role" as they want, in order to live through a story, as much in the game as around the table. But it's also a board game with rules which allow for reflection and optimization.

At the beginning of the game, the players are at their home base and receive their mission briefing. The object is then to complete it in as few attempts as possible. The actions and movements of the players will use Temporal Units (TU), the quantity of which depend on the scenario and the amount of players. Each attempt is called a "run"; one run equals the use of all of the Temporal Units at the players' disposal. When the TU reach zero, the agents are recalled to the agency, and restart the scenario from the beginning, armed with their experience. The object of the game is to make the perfect run, while solving all of the puzzles and overcoming all of a scenario’s obstacles.

The base box contains the entirety of the T.I.M.E Stories system and allows players to play all of the scenarios, the first of which — Asylum — is included. During a scenario, which consists of a deck of 120+ cards, each player explores cards, presented most often in the form of a panorama. Access to some cards require the possession of the proper item or items, while others present surprises, enemies, riddles, clues, and other dangers.

You usually take possession of local hosts to navigate in a given environment, but who knows what you'll have to do to succeed? Roam a med-fan city, looking for the dungeon where the Syaan king is hiding? Survive in the Antarctic while enormous creatures lurk beneath the surface of the ice? Solve a puzzle in an early 20th century asylum? That is all possible, and you might even have to jump from one host to another, or play against your fellow agents from time to time...

In the box, an insert allows players to "save" the game at any point, to play over multiple sessions, just like in a video game. This way, it's possible to pause your ongoing game by preserving the state of the receptacles, the remaining TU, the discovered clues, etc.

T.I.M.E Stories is a decksploring game in which each deck makes anything possible!

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Ulm is at its heyday. The construction of the Ulm cathedral has not yet been completed, but the city is already wealthy and prestigious.

In Ulm, players try to expand their spheres of influence and to make optimal use of the hustle and bustle on the marketplace around the cathedral.

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Zombicide: Black Plague takes the zombie apocalypse into a fantastical medieval setting! The arcane powers of the Necromancers have unleashed a zombie invasion in the age of swords and sorcery, and it's up to your group of straggling survivors to not only stay alive during these dark times, but to take back the realm and punish those responsible for the apocalypse!

Zombicide: Black Plague allows you take control of paladins, dwarves, knights, and magicians, wielding powerful swords, crossbows, and even magic spells to defeat the zombie hordes and its Necromancer overlords. The classic Zombicide rules have been revamped for this new incarnation of the game, while still retaining the nonstop action, tense atmosphere and easy-to-learn rules that made Zombicide a classic. Equip your survivor with equipment like chainmail armor or shields to defend against the undead, pick up spell books to perform fantastic enchantments, or light up a pool of dragon bile to create an all-consuming inferno of dragon fire!

Take on the zombie invasion from the medieval streets to secret vaults that create quick passages through the citadel (and often hold special artifacts). Chase down the elusive Necromancers to keep them from multiplying the zombie masses. And tackle a whole new set of missions through which your group of survivors will become the heroes of the land (or the last victims of the zombie massacre).

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7-9pm
GMT-07
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As Hitler's grasp on Germany tightens and his maniacal fervor is unmasked, men from the highest levels of the Reich begin to plot his assassination. As the clock ticks and Hitler's ambitions grow, these daring few must build their strength and prepare for the perfect moment to strike. The Gestapo hound their trail, calling these conspirators "Schwarze Kapelle", the Black Orchestra. Will this band of daring patriots save their country from utter ruin before it is too late?

Black Orchestra begins with each player choosing a historic figure involved in the conspiracy against Hitler. In this dark and dangerous pursuit, motivation is perhaps your greatest weapon. If you can stay true to your convictions in the face of overwhelming threat and inspire your comrades, then you will be able to use your special ability, attempt plots, and even become zealous (necessary for some extremely daring plots).

But every move you make may also increase the suspicion of the authorities. The Gestapo will make routine sweeps, and any players with high suspicion will be arrested and interrogated (possibly resulting in other players being arrested). If you are all arrested or if the Gestapo finds your secret papers, you lose. And the suspicion placed on each conspirator will increase the chances their plots are detected.

On a turn, players may take three actions, such as moving, searching for an item, or drawing a card; or, at the cost of one action per die, roll the dice in an attempt to gain even more actions — at the risk of attracting the suspicion of the gestapo. This dice rolling "Conspire" action allows players to make bold moves when most needed.

After the actions have been taken, an event card is drawn. The game is played over seven stages of World War 2, represented by seven stacks of event cards. These cards walk you through the events of WWII in a roughly (but not strictly) chronological order. New stages open up new areas of the board, cause Hitler and his deputies to interact with the Conspirators, and present various opportunities or threats. During the final stage, many board spaces become off-limits, as the Allies move closer to Germany.

To win, players must collect a plot card and fulfill all necessary requirements listed (such as having Hitler be in a certain space and possessing certain items--detonator & fuse, etc.). The active player may then attempt the plot by rolling the indicated dice, including all additional modifiers and helpful Action cards. The total of number of "Target" symbols needed to kill Hitler is based on Hitler's military support, but a Conspirator's security level decides if any "Eagles" rolled will see them detected, and foil the plot regardless. Players must consider their ability to successfully complete a plot and the relative suspicion levels of the different Conspirators involved.

Players will need to work together and agree on the wisest course of action, as well as have a little luck, to succeed. The phenomenon of one player dominating the game because of it's cooperative nature is mitigated by the fact that there are no certainties, and often a player will need to make a bold or reckless move to keep the conspiracy alive. Cool heads often prevail, but play it too cool and you may miss your chance. The co-operative dynamic gets really interesting if a player is ever arrested, and fails to resist interrogation, then they will need to make a big decision all by themselves, without revealing their options to the group. No one player can guarantee success. It is hoped that players will have tense conversations similar to those had by the real conspirators and enjoy a truly unique historical experience.

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From 7 pm till 9 pm is our board game auction. Sign up here so we know numbers!

If you want to submit games for the auction send us a message via our Facebook page, or email kefconvention@gmail.com to submit games.

We charge a listing fee of $2.00 per game.

Last year we had almost 200 games, and we sold about 70% of them!

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9pm-12am
GMT-07
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Dogs of War is an elegant game set in a steampunk-influenced renaissance universe. Noble houses engage each other in a series of fierce battles, and it's up to the players and the Dogs of War they control to deploy their private armies in support of whatever house they wish to favor. Clockwork knights and imposing war machines shift the tides of war as they enter the battlefields, but the interest of their Dog of War captains actually lie in the rewards offered by each noble house to its supporters. Each Dog of War has a special ability that helps them claim influence, win battles, or betray the house to which they've sworn allegiance!

Dogs of War is not a game of pure military power, but rather a game in which deception and betrayal often lead the way to a decisive victory. The goal for the Dogs of War is to earn the most power by the end of the game. Thanks to thoughtful game design and development, there are many ways to achieve this, like defeating other captains in battle, getting rewards from the Houses you help, amassing gold and troops, and most importantly, gaining influence with the most successful Houses.

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Across the globe, ancient evil is stirring. Now, you and your trusted circle of colleagues must travel around the world, working against all odds to hold back the approaching horror. Foul monsters, brutal encounters, and obscure mysteries will take you to your limit and beyond. All the while, you and your fellow investigators must unravel the otherworldy mysteries scattered around the globe in order to push back the gathering mayhem that threatens to overwhelm humanity. The end draws near! Do you have the courage to prevent global destruction?

Eldritch Horror is a cooperative game of terror and adventure in which one to eight players take the roles of globetrotting investigators working to solve mysteries, gather clues, and protect the world from an Ancient One – that is, an elder being intent on destroying our world. Each Ancient One comes with its own unique decks of Mystery and Research cards, which draw you deeper into the lore surrounding each loathsome creature. Discover the true name of Azathoth or battle Cthulhu on the high seas.

While the tasks on these Mystery cards (along with the locations of otherworldly gates, menacing monsters, and helpful clues) will often inform both your travel plans and the dangers you confront, you can find adventure anywhere in the world...even where you least expect it. It is during the Encounter Phase of each turn that players resolve combat or, alternatively, build their investigators' personal stories by reading an encounter narrative from one of several types of Encounter cards. You might go head to head with a monster in Istanbul or find yourself in a tough spot with the crime syndicate in a major city. Maybe you will embark on an expedition to the Pyramids or research a clue you uncover in the unnamed wilderness. You may even find your way through a gate and explore a dimension beyond time and space.

Should you fail an encounter, the cost is steep. If you are fortunate, you will merely incur physical or mental trauma. However, you might also be compelled to take a Condition card, which represents a specific injury or restriction gained throughout your journey, such as a Leg Injury or Amnesia. You could find yourself getting in over your head to acquire assets and receive a Debt condition – or maybe you'll owe a favor to something far more insidious than a debt collector, and enter into a Dark Pact! Whatever your condition, you would be wise to find a resolution with haste; many conditions have a "reckoning effect" which, if triggered, ensure a much more sinister fate.

All the while, the arrival of the Ancient One approaches. Its malign influence is manifested in Eldritch Horror as you draw Mythos Cards, which govern the appearance of otherworldly gates, fearsome monsters, and other ominous elements. Mythos cards keep your investigators under pressure, introducing new threats, even as the arrival of the Great Old One draws nearer! Since the investigators draw a new Mythos card each round, they're certain to have their hands full battling foul creatures and following up on strange rumors, even as they work to solve their three all-important mysteries.

With twelve unique investigators, two hundred-fifty tokens, and over three hundred cards, Eldritch Horror presents an epic, world-spanning adventure with each and every game.

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*Note* A first for KEFCon is the hosting of a RPG title! We're really excited about hosting this game for an evening slot.

Maybe some dude from youth group talked you web_fiascointo boosting a case of motor oil, but now your cousin is dead in a swamp and you killed him.

Maybe you and your girlfriend figured you could scare your wife into a divorce, but things went pear-shaped and now a gang of cranked-up Mexicans with latex gloves and a pit bull are looking for you. It seemed like such a good idea at the time.

Fiasco is inspired by cinematic tales of small time capers gone disastrously wrong – inspired by films like Blood Simple, Fargo, The Way of the Gun, Burn After Reading, and A Simple Plan. You’ll play ordinary people with powerful ambition and poor impulse control. There will be big dreams and flawed execution. It won’t go well for them, to put it mildly, and in the end it will probably all go south in a glorious heap of jealousy, murder, and recrimination. Lives and reputations will be lost, painful wisdom will be gained, and if you are really lucky, your guy just might end up back where he started.

FIASCO is an award-winning, GM-less game for 3-5 players, designed to be played in a few hours with six-sided dice and no preparation. During a game you will engineer and play out stupid, disastrous situations, usually at the intersection of greed, fear, and lust. It’s like making your own Coen brothers movie, in about the same amount of time it’d take to watch one.

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An upcoming Roxley Games release!

Gorilla Marketing is a party game of naming ridiculous products, movies, companies, bands, and more! It is played over 2 rounds: in round 1 you name the thing, and in round 2 you write the advertising tag line for it.

Round 1 starts by each player picking a category and writing it at the top of their booklet. If we're playing the movie pack, these categories might be something like Horror or Western. Each turn, pass booklets to the left and roll the dice to form an acronym. Players must use the letters that were rolled and write down the name of a ridiculous movie that fits the acronym and the category of the booklet in front of them. Once your booklet comes back to you, it's time to use Award Tiles to judge the best answers!

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America in the 19th century: You are a rancher and repeatedly herd your cattle from Texas to Kansas City, where you send them off by train. This earns you money and victory points. Needless to say, each time you arrive in Kansas City, you want to have your most valuable cattle in tow. However, the "Great Western Trail" not only requires that you keep your herd in good shape, but also that you wisely use the various buildings along the trail. Also, it might be a good idea to hire capable staff: cowboys to improve your herd, craftsmen to build your very own buildings, or engineers for the important railroad line.

If you cleverly manage your herd and navigate the opportunities and pitfalls of Great Western Trail, you surely will gain the most victory points and win the game.

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Mansions of Madness: Second Edition is a fully cooperative, app-driven board game of horror and mystery for one to five players that takes place in the same universe as Eldritch Horror and Elder Sign. Let the immersive app guide you through the veiled streets of Innsmouth and the haunted corridors of Arkham's cursed mansions as you search for answers and respite. Eight brave investigators stand ready to confront four scenarios of fear and mystery, collecting weapons, tools, and information, solving complex puzzles, and fighting monsters, insanity, and death. Open the door and step inside these hair-raising Mansions of Madness: Second Edition. It will take more than just survival to conquer the evils terrorizing this town.

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In the distant future, the home planet is overpopulated and riots loom. The only solution seems to be to advance into space and to settle planets. Several technically advanced nations emphatically try to put this into practice.

Under the name of Solarius Mission they begin a project to explore other planets, build space stations and conduct interplanetary trade. Who is able to use the technical means available and to fulfill the vital Solarius Mission?

With their space ship, the players explore far away planets, develop new technologies with their tech dice, and send settlers into space. They try to prevent space contamination.

Solarius Mission is a very eclectic game – it is important to think ahead and to optimize the personal strategy. Who acts especially prudent, who will win in the end?

Solarius Mission is a tactical and strategic civilization game in a pulp science-fiction setting, with a dice-draft, dice manipulation, and resource-management mechanism. It can best be described as a mid-weight euro-style game.

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Vinhos (the Portuguese word for "wines") is a trading and economic game about wine making. Despite its small size, Portugal is one of the world's leading wine producers. Over six years of harvests, cultivate your vines, choose the best varieties, hire the best oenologists, take part in trade fairs, and show your opponents you are the best winemaker in the game.

As winemakers in Portugal, the players develop their vineyards and produce wine to achieve maximum profit. The object of the game is to produce quality wines that can be exchanged for money or victory points.

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